Epic Training Update, Including Tips for Class

SHARE has a deep interest in the success of Epic. Our hospital has invested significantly in the new Epic system, and the our progress will be tied to its implementation. In a recent SHARE Rep meeting, we compared experiences with Epic Training. Most Reps generally agreed that trainers had been knowledgeable and helpful. They felt the hospital had made it an imperative to make sure that every employee succeeds with the testing required for Epic GoLive.

That said, we also heard about problems. In some classes, materials hadn’t been pertinent to everyone in the class. SHARE communicated a thorough roundup to the hospital leadership in charge of Epic, and our report lined up with the other feedback they’d been hearing, including concerns about:

  • In-class hardware issues
  • Class location
  • Parking
  • Accessing the Epic Playground
  • Ensuring accuracy with meal count
  • Consistency between trainer instructional delivery
  • Trainers not always able to respond to UMMHC policy related workflow questions

Hospital leadership seems to be responding quickly to correct shortcomings. The good news is that exit evaluations show that employees have found the Epic Trainings to be very beneficial. And that the trainings are getting better over time.

Those who have already been through Epic implementation at other hospitals tell us that it’s common at this point for employees to feel anxious about the amount that they’ll need to know at GoLive. Hospital leaders have described that employee feedback has helped them better understand our hospital’s unique needs. They are working with Epic to tailor a robust set of easy-to-use tools to make the transition to Epic successful for every employee.

If you haven’t yet been to an Epic training, SHARE Representative (and Epic Superuser) Kate Richardson makes the following suggestions:

  • Take strong notes and write down as much as you can. This will be a great reference come GoLive.
  • Keep your classroom materials, you will need these to practice in the playground.
  • Practice in the playground often.

SHARE members can learn more at www.ummhcepiccentral.org


The Great SHARE Recipe Swap: Jillian Schellhammer's Crab Rangoon Dip


RECIPES WANTED!
In honor of SHARE's 20th Anniversary (And, to prepare for the big Celebration), we're currently accepting recipes for the Great SHARE Recipe Swap.
We'd love to include your recipe in the collection. Find more details, including an easy submission form, on the Great SHARE Recipe Swap website.
To whet your appetite, here's a recipe provided by SHARE member Jillian Schellhammer, who works in Provider Enrollment in our hospital.

Crag Rangoon Dip with Toasted Won Tons and Sweet Thai Chili Sauce
About this Dish: I'm always preparing my house's dinner for the week on Mondays.. Feeling good, beginning of the week, I'm thinkin', "let's have a movie night Friday, and I'll make snacks!" - meaning, I will be tired after a long work week and have to host friends that I invited when I was energized (this happens, well, every week..). So, I prepared my Monday grocery shopping list and set off to the store. Thursday comes around, I'm already dreading hosting this little get together - thinking about all the cooking I will have to do.. Is there a way I can just order pizza..? Then it's Friday. I know how I am, I do this all of the time, I know that I'm going to go way overboard - and what do I do? Just that. BUT! It was totally worth it, and actually ended up being decently easy (just time consuming, you can easily make the thai chili sauce ahead of time or use store bought - I prefer homemade). Give it a try to wow your guests, or just yourself when you're craving some crab rangoons but really don't want the guilty feeling at the end.
Ingredients and How to Make It:
Crab Rangoon Dip Ingredients:
12oz lump crabmeat (or imitation crab), drained and shredded
8 oz cream cheese
1/3 cup sour cream
1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
1 1/2 tsp Worcestershire
2 tsp soy sauce
3 tsp lemon juice
2 tsp Sriracha
2 cloves minced garlic
1/2 tsp black pepper
1 package won ton wrappers (optional)
Sliced scallions

Sweet Thai Chili Sauce Ingredients:
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/4 cup water
2 tbsp white vinegar
1 tbsp. cornstarch
1 tsp garlic paste
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp red chili flakes (I add a dash more for a little more kick!)

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350F
IF DIPPING WITH WON TONS: Cut them into triangles, 2 per sheet. Add them to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, spray with cooking spray, and bake for 5-7 minutes until golden brown. Set aside.
In a large bow, mix crabmeat, cream cheese, sour cream, 1 cup shredded mozzarella, Worcestershire, soy sauce, lemon juice, Sriracha, garlic and pepper. Add salt to taste, give it another stir, and add to a casserole dish.
Top with remaining 1/2 cup of mozzarella cheese and bake for 25 minutes until the top begins to brown.
While dip is cooking, whisk all Sweet Thai Chili Sauce ingredients in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Once boiling, reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes or until thickened.
Garnish hot Crab Rangoon dip with Sweet Thai Chili Sauce drizzle and chopped scallions. Dip with toasted won tons or dippers of your choice.
... ENJOY!
Additional comments: Baked won ton wrappers can easily be substituted with any chip/cracker of your choice.
Leftover Sweet Thai Chili Sauce can be stored in a jar in the refrigerator for a few months.
FYI, won ton wrappers are found in the produce section!
Personal recipe blog coming SOON!
Submitted By: Jillian Schellhammer
Department: UMass Memorial Medical Group - Provider Enrollment

SHARE Member in the Spotlight: Debra Clark

Deb Clark, standing for a strong contract
on the University Campus
As we come up on SHARE's 20th Anniversary, we're reflecting on how far our union has come.

After our most recent contract negotiations, I sat down with Deb Clark, a long-term UMass Memorial employee and SHARE union leader. She’s got a unique perspective on our contract and negotiations. Deb is a veteran negotiator and member of the SHARE Executive Board. Incidentally, in the past, she’s also been laid off from the hospital three times, and has intimate familiarity with SHARE’s work-security policy.


SHARE’s been working to improve UMass Memorial for twenty years, and, in spite of our successes, our hospital often isn’t a happier place. What does Deb Clark think about that? Is there reason to be more optimistic now?


As she points out, one optimistic note is that the hospital’s commitment to working with SHARE to improve the culture for employees is now spelled out in our contract: “We have their full support to make sure that these things happen. They are committed to doing it,” she said.


I interviewed Deb because I wanted to know, from her perspective, now that our new contract is being implemented: what does she think of the work that we’re doing? Where does it go from here? If you know her, you won’t be surprised that Deb has her own ideas about SHARE’s outlook in the years to come. Here’s our full conversation . . .


Kirk Davis
SHARE Staff Organizer


KD: Debbie Clark! Where do you work and what do you do all day?


DC: I work in Lakeside A, the CDU [Clinical Decision Unit]. I'm the unit clerk, and we're pretty busy down there. We're constantly busy, moving, doing something different every minute.


KD: I don't see how it would be anything else there. You and I have been on the SHARE negotiating team at least a couple of times before. How many negotiations have you been in?


I think this is my third negotiations that I've been in, so . . . three.


KD: Since you've been in negotiations before: what were you expecting this time around?


I really didn't know what to expect this time around. They [the Interest-Based Bargaining principles] were all new ideas to us, that we had been trained in and worked with, and it was a kind of learn-as-you-go kind of experience, so we weren't really sure what we were in for.


KD: We did learn . . . we had formal training and a great facilitator in Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, is that the kind of thing that you're getting at?


Yes.


KD: We've always attempted to have a kind of informal Interest-Based negotiation approach, and every time we negotiate with the hospital it's different. We're always negotiating with a different negotiating team . . . a different CEO, for example, and different leaders in Labor Relations. And we've had varying levels of success with that approach. What would you say about past negotiations that would make you expect one thing or another?


Well, I think past negotiations were pretty cut-and-dried. It was "yes, no." "Yes, no." It was pretty formal. You proposed what you proposed, and they said "no." You know? SHARE tried again, management said "no." It was pretty discouraging, but by your second set of negotiations, you kind of knew that that's how it pretty much went.


This one here, we were very hopeful that it was going to be different, and it turned out to be great compared to the beginning, the very beginning, what I thought it would turn out to be. I didn't have much hope at the beginning. I knew our team was doing a great job, but I didn't have much faith that the other side really believed in it very much. That was my first opinion of it.


KD: That makes a lot of sense . . . I mean, we hadn't negotiated with -- well, a few of these people we had negotiated with before -- but they had new lead negotiators, and we didn't know what to expect. Were there particular things that started to change your mind or build trust? Was it a lot of little things? Was it one big thing that created trust? How did your change of mind happen?


Well, I think as I saw them starting to . . . maybe not totally agree with what we were saying, but at least be open to our ideas, and what we brought forth to the table. At the beginning, I don't think they knew what to do, so I don't think they were eager to play into it, but as time went on, and as we worked with them and built relationships with them, it got much better, they were trying, or at least most of them were trying, to try to come to an agreement that we could all agree to.


KD: This was a bigger group that we've ever negotiated with, on both sides, than we've ever had before. I mean, part of the difference to me felt like there was a big big cast of characters, and lots of cats to herd, in any conversation we had, and that things started to get a little bit smoother when we started breaking down into some of the Side Tables and Follow Up Groups. Which of those did you participate on?


Teams and Culture, Leaves of Absence, Documenting Department Policies, and Absenteeism . . . quite a realm of different topics.


KD: One of the things that was really good about having lots of little teams was that we got a lot done quickly. I mean, it felt like a lot of work for each little individual team, and when you added it all together, we did a lot of work in a little bit of time. At least, that's how it felt to me, and I was not even on as many groups as you. Was there a group that worked better for you, in a way that would be worth telling people about?


Well I think my smallest group was on Absenteeism, and I think because we all agreed that it was a problem that everyone needed to deal with, and we looked at in a realistic way, we came to a conclusion much faster and easier because it was pretty much laid out straight forward. You know, everybody can't be absent from work and have the work get done. You know, so, that one there was probably the easiest. It was a pretty cut and dried topic.


The Teams & Culture Side Table involves a lot a lot of things, and a lot a lot of people, so that one there took more time, more effort, but it seemed to work out well in the end as well. It was just a lot different from a simple topic group.


KD: So that's the group that was trying to figure out how to make UBT's [Unit-Based Teams] work? We've talked about that on the blog before, and we can point folks toward that.


The thing that's interesting to me, and I heard my co-worker Will saying this too, that he found himself surprised when we came to times when management was advocating for positions that are traditionally union-type arguments, and the union was advocating for things that were more management-type positions.


And you're saying that in your smallest group, you just all kind of were on the same side. You know, there needs to be a certain level of staffing, and we need to have it so people can be out when people can be out, and have the staff to run the place here. But I'm wondering, what surprised you about management's approach to teams? Were they more receptive to the idea of teams? Did they have a different idea of teams?


DC: I think first of all it's a very new topic to everybody, so nobody knows exactly what this is going to entail, but everybody in my group was very enthusiastic.  So, they're all wanting to do it, wanting to do a good job, trying to figure out where they can start it, what projects are going to be achievable so we don't have any failures at the beginning. So I think it's a happy topic, whereas absenteeism . . . not so much. It's encouraging, if it works, which we're going to make sure that it does. It's something that people can look forward to, and look forward to getting involved in. It's not a tedious kind of punishment group like some of the others were. Where, you know, you're doing something bad, what's going to happen to you? This is all good. Doing something good. Trying to make things better.


KD: Can you imagine that kind of topic being discussed in any of our previous negotiations? We've not had a topic that happy in past negotiations, I don't think. How much of that is dependent on the people who are negotiating?


DC: For SHARE’s part, this work just kind of keeps going. For a while, we focused a lot on Patient-Experience Projects. We did a great job. In the end, everyone had good intentions, but it just petered-out, you know? You go along go along go along . . . then okay, where is it? It’s gone. Everyone had great intentions, but there was no means to finish the project off and actually come up with results. So people are skeptical that anything can ever really happen, and truly be good.


KD: I’m really interested in that thing that you said, about in the past things just petered out, even SHARE’s best-intended projects. We had some success, and then other priorities took over. Those improvement projects didn’t have -- I forgot your exact words -- but they didn’t have what it takes to see it through to the end, not in a way that improved the hospital as a whole. You still sound, in spite of that, optimistic, that this round negotiations is turning out some different kind of outcome, that isn’t going to fizzle. You sound optimistic in spite of your experience. Obviously we don’t know yet. What makes you feel like this could actually bring more more effective outcomes than we’ve had before?


DC: Because this time around I have, and I’m depending on this, the words of people like Bart Metzger and Eric Dickson, that we have their full support to make sure that these things happen. They are committed to doing it. Committed to helping us. They’re committed to being a part. If we have questions, and we need to talk to them, speak to them, they’re committed to helping us make this be a success, so it’s the best support we’ve ever had. We’re not out there on our own, we have the words of these people, of the higher-ups at UMass, that they’re there to support us.


KD: That commitment is built into our contract now. And we’ve negotiated a lot of structural things this time. There’s one difference that we knew going in, that there’s a philosophical agreement at the top,  that frontline employees should be involved in decision-making, and it’s in the hospitals initiatives. We shall see.


Let me ask, this is our twenty-year anniversary -- come September, SHARE will be twenty years old. You’ve been here for some of that. How do think that SHARE has made an effect on the hospital in those twenty years?


DC: Well, I was speaking with SHARE before there was a union here. They were calling me at home, I was speaking with all of the organizers. I’ve always been a big pro-union person, and I believe one-hundred percent that SHARE has helped with every aspect of UMass’ people who are involved in the SHARE union. Without them, I mean, we’d be in dire straits. Before SHARE, and I was here for many years before SHARE also. I’ve been 30 years at UMass. We were at the mercy of the State of Massachusetts. So we got whacked quite a few times, and there was no one to turn to, it’s just the way that it was. You just had to accept it, or go work somewhere else. You know, so SHARE has been great as far as I’m concerned. I don’t have a bad thing to say about our union at all.



KD: We’re looking forward to another twenty years more, at least. What’s the best thing that you’d like to see happen, what’s something you’d like to see SHARE do in that 20 years. What would you like to be able to say, “Boy, SHARE really knocked it out of the park by doing . . . x?"


DC: Well I think along with our contract that we just negotiated, keeping our pay competitive, so people can afford to live, so they’re not impoverished. That’s very important to me. Our health benefits, keeping them affordable -- which SHARE always has done -- is very, very important. So, I think those are the two main things. You have to come to work, and you have to be able to do a day’s work for a day’s pay, and make it the best we can. SHARE has helped, and that’s what we’re aiming for with this contract. And having a decent wage, and decent benefits, which we’ve always had . . . you couldn’t ask for more. That’s what you need to work for. You have to have it to be able to survive.


KD: We have held on to really good benefits and had consistent raises for twenty years, and the challenges to those things aren’t going away. If anything, they’re getting harder. So, that makes sense to me that should still be our focus. I just want to say thanks very much. We’ll see you again at negotiations next time . . .  and of course, sooner.


DC: Thank you very much!

Slotting Pay by Experience in Peer-Based Titles

As part of contract negotiations, SHARE and UMass Memorial agreed to slotting pay by experience for SHARE members in certain titles (called peer-based titles). We are in the process now of confirming years of experience with the people affected. 

If you are not in one of these titles, you are not affected.

If you are in one of these peer-based jobs and have not received an email from SHARE asking you to confirm your experience, please get in touch asap. You can email SHARE.Comment@theshareunion.org or call Deb Largesse at the SHARE office at 508-929-4020 x23.

What are the peer-based titles?

Peer Slotted Titles
Grade
CYTOTECHNOLOGIST II
TEC12
DISPATCHER, COMMUNICATION SPEC
ADM8 
INTERPRETER
ADM7 
LPN, AMBULATORY
NSG10
LPN, MAMMOGRAPHY
NSG10
LPN, MEDICAL GROUP
NSG10
STUDENT COORD, NUC MED
TEC13
TECH, ENDO-ADV PROCED (LPN)
NSG11
TECH, PHARMACY PROCUREMENT
TEC7 
TECHNICIAN, HISTOLOGY II
TEC10
TECHNICIAN, PHARMACY CERT, TOC
TEC7 
TECHNICIAN, PHARMACY CERTIFIED
TEC7 
TECHNOL, U/S REG-CARD U/S
TEC14
TECHNOL, U/S REG-VASC LAB
TEC14
TECHNOL, U/S REG-WMN HLTH
TEC14
TECHNOL, U/S-VASC LAB
TEC13
TECHNOL,RAD INVASIVE CARDIOVAS
TEC13
TECHNOLOGIST, MEDICAL II
TEC11
TECHNOLOGIST, NUCLEAR MEDICINE
TEC13
TECHNOLOGIST, RAD II
TEC12
TECHNOLOGIST, RAD II-ANGIO
TEC13
TECHNOLOGIST, RAD II-CT SCAN
TEC13
TECHNOLOGIST, RAD II-MAMMOGRPY
TEC13
TECHNOLOGIST, RAD II-MULTIMODA
TEC13
TECHNOLOGIST, ULTRASOUND
TEC13
TECHNOLOGIST, ULTRASOUND REG
TEC14
TECHNOLOGIST,MEDICAL,BLOOD BNK
TEC12
THERAPIST, RADIATION I
TEC13
THERAPIST, RADIATION II
TEC14
THERAPIST, RESPIRATORY II
TEC12

About 20% of SHARE members are in a peer-based title. In a previous contract, the other 80% of SHARE members had their pay slotted -- they got raises to put them on platforms if they were too low for their years of experience. On October 1, SHARE members in the peer-based titles who are too low for their years of experience will get raises to put them on the correct platform.

Why were peer-based titles treated differently than other titles?

They are jobs that had their pay rates adjusted for equity many years ago, because the hospital was having trouble hiring and keeping people in these titles. Each title got its own pay scale. In 2008, we created pay scales with platforms for all the other jobs in SHARE. The platform-based system we created has been working well, so we are moving to using it for all SHARE members.

What is the purpose of slotting?

The goal is to increase both equity and transparency. SHARE and UMass Memorial have negotiated platforms for each pay grade, based on years of experience. Anyone in a peer-based title who is still below the right platform, after their raise, will get an additional raise to bring their pay up to the right platform. New employees will also be hired onto the scale based on their experience. Everyone will be able to see what the scale is and where they are on it. We have been working toward this goal for several years, and we are very proud of our agreement.

Am I getting a raise?

All SHARE members are getting their contractual raise October 1. Some people will get an additional slotting raise, but most people will not be affected by the slotting.
  • Anyone in a peer-based title who is below the right platform will get an additional raise to bring their pay up to the right platform.
  • Most people in the peer-based titles are already at or above their platform – they will not be affected. No one’s pay will go down through slotting.
  • Anyone who is not in a peer-based title will not be affected because their titles are already platform-based. 

Free College Humanities Course

Looking for more free educational opportunities? SHARE Executive Board Member Larry Madden points out that the August interview deadline for the Worcester Clemente Course in the Humanities is coming up quickly.

Larry himself is a graduate, and an advisory board member to the Clemente Course, which offers 6 free college credits, all-expenses-paid (including books, daycare, and public transportation). For more information, visit the Clemente Course website, or email Larry.

Workplace Violence Prevention Forum

By the end of last week’s panel discussion on Workplace Violence Prevention, a few takeaways were very clear:

  1. Workplace violence is up, the rates are especially high in hospitals, and our hospital is no exception.
  2. The executive leadership of UMass Memorial is very actively working on solutions.
  3. Our hospital needs to enlist much more help from frontline employees to make significant improvements.

Of course, in the many areas where SHARE members work, workplace violence is a big, broad, serious subject. The panel brought together experts from our hospital and medical school who spoke to the spectrum of issues. Not every question led to a clear answer. UMass Memorial President Patrick Muldoon concluded the event by noting that the efforts so far are only a beginning.

University Campus Police Chief John Luippold praised caregivers, and encouraged us to recognize all that UMass Memorial employees do already to get patients home safely, consistently, day after day. Luippold also emphasized that all employees should trust their gut if they sense that something is out of the ordinary.

Dr. Sheldon Benjamin, Interim Chair of the UMMS Department of Psychiatry, elaborated on that idea. He explained that extremely important for caregivers to remove themselves from a situation that seems potentially dangerous, and then get help. As he put it: the main job of a caregiver is to stay able to help others.

Over 100 audience members attended, including many hospital and medical school leaders. Afterward, SHARE Co-President Rita Caputo remarked: The panel had so much information!  But not a lot of the kind of information that we can use at work. She’s looking forward to events where employees share their experiences, and help innovate new solutions.

How to Help with Violence Prevention

If you work in areas that experience violent patients, or “lateral” employee-on-employee bullying, then the Workplace Violence Working Group would particularly like to include you in their efforts. (To inquire or become involved, contact Sharon Gaynor, Senior Director of Employee Health, or Dr. Maria Michas, Employee Health Medical Director.)

You can also ready yourself for difficult situations by enrolling in the hospital’s Nonviolent Crisis Intervention Program, provided by the Crisis Prevention Institute. SHARE members who have already taken the course have said that they found it really helpful.

What’s Being Done Now?

The panel described a number of initiatives and procedures that are already in place to provide help, including:

  • The hospital’s Workplace Violence Working Group, which currently consists of 59 members.
  • Installation of over 300 “panic buttons” at strategic places throughout the institution.
  • Legislation such as Elise’s Law--named in honor of the nurse from Harrington Hospital who was recently assaulted by a patient--which pressures hospitals to increase security.  

To Report Incidents of Violence

To report incidents of violence, or potential violence, please call:

  • Off Campus: 911
  • University Campus Police: 6-3296
  • Memorial/Hahnemann Campus Police: 4-8568
  • Employee Health: 3-6400

Read more about the Workplace Violence Prevention forum in News & Views. Soon we hope report about how to watch the event yourself online, using on-demand video. More to come . . .

New SHARE Rep Training

Sixteen SHARE Representatives from throughout the UMass Memorial system completed the most recent New Rep Training course. The course is designed to provide an overview of our union and the ways that Reps build community and help their co-workers. Along the way, we traded a lot of stories about different work areas. 




The curriculum introduces a number of topics, including:

  • Who's in SHARE
  • SHARE's place in the labor movement
  • Using the SHARE Contract 
  • Building the union membership and cultivating community
  • Interest-Based Negotiating Methods
  • What happens in Contract Negotiations
  • Why SHARE focuses on system improvement
  • Unit-Based Teams, and other ways of engaging members in decision making
  • Labor-Management Partnership
  • Problem-Solving, including the Disciplinary Process

As we considered what's ahead for our union, the new Reps talked enthusiastically. And there were many funny moments. Afterward, Christean Hughes, a Medical Billing Specialist at 306 Belmont Street, said, "I loved it. I think everyone in our union should get to go to a meeting like that." We're lucky to have this new group of Reps, and are looking forward to more together.  

Workplace Violence Discussion this Friday

According to OSHA statistics, healthcare workers are four times more likely than employees in private industry to encounter workplace violence, and the rates are increasing. Patient care poses unique challenges, and many SHARE members are at increased risk.
To address the concerns in our hospital, a Workplace Violence Panel Discussion will be held this Friday, July 28, noon to 1 pm, in Amphitheatre III, on the University Campus. (The panel discussion will also be broadcast in the Memorial Campus Amphitheater and  in the Hahnemann Campus, 2nd Floor Conference Room, and recorded for on-demand viewing.)
Getting free from work responsibilities can be hectic--especially while navigating the busy lunchtime elevators and finding something to eat; managers are being encouraged to provide coverage to ensure that front-line employees from many areas can attend.
If you would like to come and learn more about how to curb the violence, and the ways that our hospital is addressing the problem, please talk with your supervisor or manager.
To reach Amphitheatre III from the main UMMS entrance, take a left at the main corridor and take the second right to locate the elevators. Take the elevator to either the 6th or 7th floor and follow posted signs to the entrance.


SHARE Career Development Workshops

Feeling confident?
Come to the Interview Skills Workshop
to hone your strengths
The first workshops of the new SHARE Career Development Series are on the books. Sign up now! These are designed to help SHARE members advance their skills and their careers at UMass Memorial. The workshops are being organized by the SHARE-UMass Memorial Workforce Planning Partnership Committee, created in our most recent contract negotiations.

The sessions will provide strategies, tips, and resources for maximizing your strengths as an internal candidate. We encourage you to register in advance to ensure your place in the workshop, although walk-ins will be welcome if there are empty seats. To Register, visit EL4U (additional instructions for first-time users below).

The following sessions are open for registration:


RESUME DEVELOPMENT
*Articulate your skills and work history, and put your best foot forward in the application process. Gain an understanding of different resume formats, effectively market your experience, and avoid pitfalls by learning what should and should not be included in a resume.
University Campus
Thursday, July 20th 12:00-1:00
Goff S2-309C  (Capacity: 25)
Memorial Campus
Tuesday, July 25th 12:00-1:00
Memorial 1 Conference Room (near the cafeteria, toward the ED) (Capacity: 15)
INTERVIEW SKILLS
*Participants will review the steps necessary to prepare for an interview including homework before the meeting, and what to expect during the interview.   Gain confidence answering various types of interview questions, create and practice responses, and learn how to effectively follow up.
Memorial Campus
Tuesday, August 1st 12:00-1:00
Memorial 1 Conference Room  (near the cafeteria, toward the ED) (Capacity: 15)


University Campus
Thursday, August 3rd noon-1:00
Goff S2-309C  (Capacity: 25)


We hope you can join us! And, if you aren’t able to make it to one of these Summertime workshops, there will be more opportunities. In the Fall, we will repeat these topics and include additional Career Planning sessions.


To Register for classes posted in EL4U:
Log In Page  http://healthstream.com/hlc/ummhc
User ID: Employee ID Number

Password: The first time you log in, your password is the same as your User ID; Users are then asked to create a new password


If you have questions, please call the SHARE office (508-929-4020).

2017-2018 SHARE Executive Board and Representatives

SHARE union leaders are elected by SHARE members during annual elections. They work closely with the SHARE organizing staff and work hard to keep our union strong.

The Executive Board (or "EBoard"), including the four officers, makes decisions about the direction of our union, and participates in contract negotiations. They are elected for two-year terms. They have responsibility for the whole union, and each board member is responsible for a few hundred members in their area. 

SHARE Representatives (or "Reps") serve as the contact person for their area. They are elected for one-year terms. There is roughly one Rep for every fifty SHARE members. Some Reps are trained to help co-workers solve problems in the workplace. In addition to the currently-elected Reps, several former Reps and unofficial Reps help members in their area keep up-to-date about current SHARE news, and help their co-workers find helpful SHARE resources.


SHARE Officers

Co-Presidents
Rita Caputo (University)                     PRIMARY CARE CLINIC

Bobbi-Jo Lewis (Memorial)                 SHARE ORGANIZING STAFF

Secretary
Sandra Alafberg                                 BILLING SUPPORT SERVICES

Treasurer
Kathy Girouard                                  HEART & VASC INTVL LAB
SHARE Executive Board
306 Belmont
Sheldon Brown                                  AR DENIAL MGMT TEAM 1
ACC
Sharon Pichierri                                  ORTHOPEDICS CLINIC
Memorial
Nancy Bickford                                   WEST 3
Laura M Welch                                   WOMENS SERVICES UROGYN
Jay Hagan                                          CAT SCAN
University
Tony Martocci                                    CARDIOVASC MED
Debbie Clark                                      ADMISSIONS UNIT
LeDean Buzzell                                   PEDIATRICS ADMINISTRATION
Joel Masley                                        RESPIRATORY THERAPY
WBC
Larry Madden                                    CENTRAL SCHEDULING
SHARE Representatives
306 Belmont
Kate Richardson                                 BILLING SUPPORT SERVICES
Christean Hughes                               CBO A/R
Patty Strait                                         AR DENIAL MGMT TEAM 1
Katie Kornitsky                                  AR DENIAL MGMT TEAM 2
67 Belmont
Cheryl Ferriter                                   SURGERY 67 BELMONT
ACC
Angela Robert                                    CARDIOVASCULAR CLN A CVC
Kellie Morton                                    ONCOLOGY CLINIC
Tammy Berry                                     BREAST CTR SURGICAL ONCOLOGY
Barre
Joanie Pulnik                                      BARRE HEALTH CENTER
Biotech 3
Nicole Ninteau                                   ANPA MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC
Hahnemann
Kelly A Rawlston                                MEDICAL STAFF ADMIN
Wanda Dyer                                      FAMILY MEDICINE CLINIC
Eleanor A Beshai                                HAHNEMANN MAMMOGRAPHY
Julie Dingui                                        HAHNEMANN MAMMOGRAPHY
Memorial
Kim Duncan                                       EMERGENCY ROOM
Brichelle Soto Guerrero                     ED REGISTRATION
Adrianna Nathan                               EMERGENCY ROOM
Kim Latrobe                                       SURGICAL VASCULAR LAB
Faye Serafin                                       WOMENS SERVICES REI
Debbie Church                                   MATERNITY-DELIVERY
Nana Kwapong                                  SOUTH 6
Tracy O'Donnell                                 FAMILY MED HOSP PROGRAM
Monique Winston                              SURGICAL ONCOLOGY
Debbie Horgan                                          PALLIATIVE CARE
Christina Sasso                                   PERINATOLOGY
Andrea Caraglior                                RESPIRATORY THERAPY
Leah Berthiaume                               MAMMOGRAPHY
Jessica Joslyn                                     RADIOLOGY DIAGNOSTIC
Claudia Twum                                    RADIOLOGY DIAGNOSTIC
Queen St
David Gogo                                        3 PTC PSYCH NURSING
Tri River
Mary Misiaszek                                  TRI RIVER CLINIC ADMIN
University
Kelly Yuscinsky                                   EMERGENCY ROOM
Tyler Knapp                                       OUTPATIENT REGISTRATION
Denise Savageau-Page                       EMERGENCY ROOM
Sue Maddalena                                  HEART & VASC INTVL LAB
Milka Gonzalez                                  INTERPRETER SERVICES
Sylvia Rodriguez                                 BMTU
Katrina Baer                                       NURSE STAFFING
Betty Maurais                                    LUNG/ALLERGY CENTER
Kona Enders                                      NURSING 3 WEST
Elsa M Benavides                               INTERPRETER SERVICES
Yamilka Velazquez                             INTERPRETER SERVICES
Cathy Gaulin                                      PRESCRIPTION CENTER
Vanessa De Los Santos                       TRANSPLANT CLINIC
April McIntyre                                   SURGERY ADMINISTRATION
Maria Wentworth                              PEDIATRICS ADMINISTRATION
Anita Pratt                                         PEDI ENDO/DIABETES
Nancy Bellantoni                                NEURODIAGNOSTIC CENTER
Luz Gomez                                        NEUROLOGY CLINIC
Tracey Zaczek                                    RESPIRATORY THERAPY
Marie Marley                                     RADIATION ONCOLOGY
Stephanie Pepi                                  TRAUMA SERVICES
David Leveille                                    ANGIOGRAPHY
Brian Cotoni                                      COMMUNICATION CENTER
Jen O'Loughlin                                   CAT SCAN
Rich Leufstedt                                   RADIOLOGY DIAGNOSTIC
WBC
Jennifer Mensah                                CENTRAL SCHEDULING
Nicole Bragg                                      PATIENT ACCESS SVS PRE ARRIVAL
Jackie Brammer                                 CENTRAL SCHEDULING
Susan E. Johnson                               CENTRAL SCHEDULING
Megan Bosworth                               CENTRAL SCHEDULING
                                     

SHARE Union Leadership, 2017-18

SHARE union leaders are elected by SHARE members during annual elections. They work closely with the SHARE organizing staff and work hard to keep our union strong.

The Executive Board (or "EBoard"), including the four officers, makes decisions about the direction of our union, and participates in contract negotiations. They are elected for two-year terms. They have responsibility for the whole union, and each board member is responsible for a few hundred members in their area. 

SHARE Representatives (or "Reps") serve as the contact person for their area. They are elected for one-year terms. There is roughly one Rep for every fifty SHARE members. Some Reps are trained to help co-workers solve problems in the workplace. In addition to the currently-elected Reps, several former Reps and unofficial Reps help members in their area keep up-to-date about current SHARE news, and help their co-workers find helpful SHARE resources.


SHARE Officers

Co-Presidents
Rita Caputo (University)                     PRIMARY CARE CLINIC

Bobbi-Jo Lewis (Memorial)                 SHARE ORGANIZING STAFF

Secretary
Sandra Alafberg                                 BILLING SUPPORT SERVICES

Treasurer
Kathy Girouard                                  HEART & VASC INTVL LAB
SHARE Executive Board
306 Belmont
Sheldon Brown                                  AR DENIAL MGMT TEAM 1
ACC
Sharon Pichierri                                  ORTHOPEDICS CLINIC
Memorial
Nancy Bickford                                   WEST 3
Laura M Welch                                   WOMENS SERVICES UROGYN
Jay Hagan                                          CAT SCAN
University
Tony Martocci                                    CARDIOVASC MED
Debbie Clark                                      ADMISSIONS UNIT
LeDean Buzzell                                   PEDIATRICS ADMINISTRATION
Joel Masley                                        RESPIRATORY THERAPY
WBC
Larry Madden                                    CENTRAL SCHEDULING
SHARE Representatives
306 Belmont
Kate Richardson                                 BILLING SUPPORT SERVICES
Christean Hughes                               CBO A/R
Patty Strait                                         AR DENIAL MGMT TEAM 1
Katie Kornitsky                                  AR DENIAL MGMT TEAM 2
67 Belmont
Cheryl Ferriter                                   SURGERY 67 BELMONT
ACC
Angela Robert                                    CARDIOVASCULAR CLN A CVC
Kellie Morton                                    ONCOLOGY CLINIC
Tammy Berry                                     BREAST CTR SURGICAL ONCOLOGY
Barre
Joanie Pulnik                                      BARRE HEALTH CENTER
Biotech 3
Nicole Ninteau                                   ANPA MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC
Hahnemann
Kelly A Rawlston                                MEDICAL STAFF ADMIN
Wanda Dyer                                      FAMILY MEDICINE CLINIC
Eleanor A Beshai                                HAHNEMANN MAMMOGRAPHY
Julie Dingui                                        HAHNEMANN MAMMOGRAPHY
Memorial
Kim Duncan                                       EMERGENCY ROOM
Brichelle Soto Guerrero                     ED REGISTRATION
Adrianna Nathan                               EMERGENCY ROOM
Kim Latrobe                                       SURGICAL VASCULAR LAB
Faye Serafin                                       WOMENS SERVICES REI
Debbie Church                                   MATERNITY-DELIVERY
Nana Kwapong                                  SOUTH 6
Tracy O'Donnell                                 FAMILY MED HOSP PROGRAM
Monique Winston                              SURGICAL ONCOLOGY
Debbie Horgan                                          PALLIATIVE CARE
Christina Sasso                                   PERINATOLOGY
Andrea Caraglior                                RESPIRATORY THERAPY
Leah Berthiaume                               MAMMOGRAPHY
Jessica Joslyn                                     RADIOLOGY DIAGNOSTIC
Claudia Twum                                    RADIOLOGY DIAGNOSTIC
Queen St
David Gogo                                        3 PTC PSYCH NURSING
Tri River
Mary Misiaszek                                  TRI RIVER CLINIC ADMIN
University
Kelly Yuscinsky                                   EMERGENCY ROOM
Tyler Knapp                                       OUTPATIENT REGISTRATION
Denise Savageau-Page                       EMERGENCY ROOM
Sue Maddalena                                  HEART & VASC INTVL LAB
Milka Gonzalez                                  INTERPRETER SERVICES
Sylvia Rodriguez                                 BMTU
Katrina Baer                                       NURSE STAFFING
Betty Maurais                                    LUNG/ALLERGY CENTER
Kona Enders                                      NURSING 3 WEST
Elsa M Benavides                               INTERPRETER SERVICES
Yamilka Velazquez                             INTERPRETER SERVICES
Cathy Gaulin                                      PRESCRIPTION CENTER
Vanessa De Los Santos                       TRANSPLANT CLINIC
April McIntyre                                   SURGERY ADMINISTRATION
Maria Wentworth                              PEDIATRICS ADMINISTRATION
Anita Pratt                                         PEDI ENDO/DIABETES
Nancy Bellantoni                                NEURODIAGNOSTIC CENTER
Luz Gomez                                        NEUROLOGY CLINIC
Tracey Zaczek                                    RESPIRATORY THERAPY
Marie Marley                                     RADIATION ONCOLOGY
Stephanie Pepi                                  TRAUMA SERVICES
David Leveille                                    ANGIOGRAPHY
Brian Cotoni                                      COMMUNICATION CENTER
Jen O'Loughlin                                   CAT SCAN
Rich Leufstedt                                   RADIOLOGY DIAGNOSTIC
WBC
Jennifer Mensah                                CENTRAL SCHEDULING
Nicole Bragg                                      PATIENT ACCESS SVS PRE ARRIVAL
Jackie Brammer                                 CENTRAL SCHEDULING
Susan E. Johnson                               CENTRAL SCHEDULING
Megan Bosworth                               CENTRAL SCHEDULING
                                     

Congratulations, 2017 Union Plus Scholarship Winners!

Congratulations to all recipients of the 2017 Union Plus Scholarship!

Sam Fountain, SHARE Member
and 2017 Scholarship Winner
We're particularly excited for Sam Fountain, a SHARE member and Research Technician right here at UMass Medical School, who will receive a $1,000 award from the AFL-CIO sponsored organization.

Sam says: I'm humbled and honored to be a recipient of a 2017 Union PLUS Scholarship Award. For the past 18 months, I've been a member of the SHARE Union, working as a Research Technician for Dr. Sanjay and Dr. Peter Rice. I'm beginning medical school here at UMass in the fall of 2017, and will use the scholarship to pay for books and other educational supplies I'll need. The cost of medical school is steep, and every penny counts. For decades my family has been benefiting from and advocating for Unionized Labor, and I'm grateful to continue this trend. Thank you to the SHARE Union for all the work you do and for advocating for workers across the University!

Union Plus scholarships totaling $150,000 were awarded this year to 106 students representing 31 unions. Danielle Boudrow, a member of HUCTW, our sister union at Harvard University, also received a $1,000 scholarship.

Applications are currently being accepted for the 2018 Union Plus Scholarships.

2018 Union Plus Scholarships

The Union Plus Education Foundation is now receiving applications for their 2018 Scholarship Program. The awards range from $500 to $4,000.


The application deadline is Tuesday, January 31, 2018.


This is a competitive scholarship, and applicants are evaluated according to academic ability, social awareness, financial need and appreciation of labor. A GPA of 3.0 or higher is recommended.


Undergraduate and graduate students are eligible. The Scholarship Program is open to current and retired members of unions participating in any Union Plus program (e.g., AFSCME), their spouses and their dependent children (as defined by IRS regulations). At least one year of continuous union membership by the applicant, applicant's spouse or parent (if applicant is a dependent). The one year membership minimum must be satisfied by May 31, 2018. Past applicants may re-apply.


The applicant must be accepted into a U.S. accredited college or university, community college, technical or trade school at the time the award is issued. Awards must be used for the 2018 - 2019 school year. You do not have to purchase any Union Plus product or participate in any Union Plus program to be eligible.


Applicants should note that the application requires you to list the national or international union name, local union number, local union's address, phone number and the name of the local union President or Business Manager.  You need this information for your union, your spouse's union or your parent's union (if you are a dependent).  If you or your family members are affiliated with multiple unions you must list this information for all.


As a member of SHARE, you are also a member of our parent organization, AFSCME, a qualifying union. Please note that the “local number” for SHARE on the hospital-side is AFSCME Local 3900. The SHARE hospital-side co-presidents are Bobbi-Jo Lewis and Rita Caputo.


For more details, and to access the online application dashboard, please see the Union Plus Scholarship website.

Overtime Opportunities for Some SHARE Members during Epic Conversion Weekends



Many SHARE members recently received an email from the hospital describing an "all-hands-on-deck" plea for help to manually input appointment and registration information into Epic, and to validate appointment and registration information that is electronically converted into Epic.
No one is required to come in on their weekend off, but the success of the Epic launch requires this step. The hospital encourages participation, and wants your help.  

To be eligible, participants must work in qualified job roles as listed in this link, and have completed appropriate training sessions prior to attending the Conversion Weekend. The hospital notes that these weekend events will provide useful experience before Epic goes live. Incentives offered for SHARE members include:  

  1. Qualified SHARE members can participate in the hospital's Epic Conversion and be paid Overtime (if they work more than 40 hours that week, or more than 8 hours that day). The weekend pay differential of $2.50 per hour will also be applied, as per the SHARE contract.
  2. Free on-site parking, lunch, and beverages will be provided.
  3. SHARE members commuting from off-site locations (non-Worcester campuses, such as Barre, Tri-River, etc.) will be paid the federal mileage rate, according to the SHARE Contract Agreement. (Currently 53.5 cents/mile.)

The work must be done on specific weekends in September, at 100 Front Street in
Worcester, in preparation for the October 1 Epic Go-Live event.  

For the Appointment Conversion weekend, September 9-10, the hospital needs 400 participants from 8 am to 5 pm.

For the Registration and Referral Conversion Weekend, September 16-17, 340 participants will be needed.  

To request a copy of the hospital's email regarding Epic Conversion, or to ask questions, please contact EpicScheduling@umassmemorial.org

A Strong Start for Unit Based Teams

The first ever UBT Co-Lead Peer-Learning event opened with SHARE Union organizer Janet Wilder thanking everyone in the room. Janet said that the newly defined relationship between SHARE members and managers is the most important language in our contract as we aim to improve the culture of our hospital. She explained that Unit-Based Teams are the cornerstone of that agreement, the most concrete and hopeful effort toward changing how it feels to work here.

Janet is the SHARE Tri-Chair of our Labor-Management Partnership Council, along with Bart Metzger, Chief Human Resources Officer, and Jeff Smith, Chief Operating Officer,

who also

kicked off the

meeting by talking about the importance of UBTs. Jeff Smith said that involving front-line staff in fixing the problem is better than the alternative: “I could give you an answer quickly, but it would be a bad solution.”

The first UBT Peer Learning Session brought together UBT Co-Sponsors and Co-Leads from SHARE, along with their management counterparts, as well as representatives from CITC, HR, and UMMC Executive Leadership. They came together to compare notes about the challenges and successes so far in the first wave of Unit Based Teams

As the hour developed, it became clear to everyone in the room that, across the board, the Unit-Based Teams are off to a productive and promising start. Each UBT has selected one or two substantial problems to tackle in their areas. They've defined their goals, and have begun measuring the effectiveness of their ideas.

SHARE Member and Lead Cardiac Catheterization Technologist, Sue Maddalena, describes how their UBT disregarded the advice that teams should avoid tackling the hardest problems first. They're seeing early successes as they work to improve the start times of their cases.   

Each UBT explained very different situations, different approaches, and different results thus far, even between the two Prescription Centers involved, on both the University and Memorial campuses. Nonetheless, common trends appeared throughout. Communication in areas with UBT's has improved, sometimes considerably. That communication is helping the day-to-day work go more smoothly, and improving the work culture.

In Primary Care, they're kicking butt and collecting data. Where employees were previously frustrated with walk-ins, they're now opportunities to collect data to fix the problem. Rita Caputo (SHARE Co-President, pictured above left) tracks the progress of their system improvements. 

SHARE member and Ambulatory Services Rep Mary Misiaszek said that, in her area, she had encountered one particularly meaningful new improvement: deeper respect. In addition, she said different parts of the clinic now "appreciate what everybody did, because we didn't know what everybody did before."

Mary noted, however, that one of the major challenges they faced was just understanding one another, since each kind of work in the hospital involves its own jargon and specialized language. As an ASR, her understanding of the distinction between words like "rapid" and "stat" differs from some co-workers, who use those words within the boundaries of defined clinical guidelines. 

The hospital's

Center for Innovation and Transformational Change

 often came up in the discussion, with participants noting the importance of the role of CITC in providing common language for discussing improvement.

SHARE member Kim Latrobe, a Technologist in the Surgical Vascular Lab, says that her co-workers are more willing to speak up about problems now, and more optimistic about the way that management will consider their ideas. 

Some in the room commented that their department staff had found it meaningful to see SHARE and hospital leadership coming together around the Unit Based Teams. Although SHARE members have experienced many different initiatives aimed at improvement over the years, this feels different. Working through issues in a process where all participants have equal voice creates mutual accountability and improved chance of continual improvement. 

Bart Metzger, UMass Memorial Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer, said that hospital CEO Eric Dickson increasingly references the importance of UBT's in meetings among hospital executives. Metzger describes the function of the UBTs toward the hospital's goals of transforming and humanizing our institution, and turning the traditional management paradigm on its head.

In the recent months, the participants in these first UBT's have learned a lot about how to launch a UBT successfully . . . much of it by trial-and-error. During the Peer Learning Session, many participants thanked the UBT Coaches and their own Co-Sponsors, who have been supporting the teams with tools and strategies for tackling big problems productively. 

Although the UBT model involves a lot of planning, there have definitely been surprises in their initial experiments. The participants recommended even more training and more planning time, and encouraged the Coaches and Co-Sponsors to begin working with the next wave of UBT's as soon as possible, even though those teams won't be launching until after Epic Go-Live. We look forward to hearing more from this first group of UBT's.

SHARE Staff Organizers Janet Wilder and Will Erickson collect ideas and advice for improving the launch of the next wave of Unit Based Teams

The hour-long meeting brought together union members and management from the University Campus and the Memorial Campus, not to mention a labor-management pair who commuted in from our hospital's Tri-River facility in Uxbridge. 

It wasn't easy to coordinate a time when so many could be away from their desks and workstations.

W

e know that whenever employees step away from the front lines to meet, it puts more pressure on those who remain in the departments to care for patients. We recognize those of you who are working in areas with UBT's for getting this important project started in such a strong way

. Already hundreds of SHARE members have helped move the work forward. Thank you. 

A NEW SHARE UNION: UMASS MEMORIAL--MARLBOROUGH HOSPITAL

For those of you who haven’t heard, we’re lending support to employees at our sister location in Marlborough who wish to join SHARE. Impressed by what we’ve accomplished, they’ve come to us with a request to join in. If you have friends at UMass Memorial’s Marlborough Hospital, we could use your help connecting them with our union.

A Rising Tide

SHARE believes that everyone benefits when workers have a say. We’re making work better for ourselves, and we want our colleagues up the road to have that opportunity, too. What’s good for Marlborough Hospital is good for UMass Memorial, and for the Central Massachusetts community.

SHARE is a union unique to UMass Memorial and UMass Medical School, tailored to our needs here. Our region is distinct, with its own economic challenges. We know that inequality is hurting us. Without unions to advocate for middle-class wages, employers alone dictate the market rate.

Our connections make us strong, and we want to strengthen and be strengthened by the inclusion of the hospital’s Marlborough location, to enlist the help of our colleagues toward improving the area where we live and work.

Everyone Should Be Free to Participate

We’ve been cultivating our own organization for twenty years at UMass Memorial. Along the way, we’ve learned a lot about negotiating, and about the need to deepen our understanding of how to run a hospital . . . how to run *our* hospital.

Those of us who have been here since our union’s beginnings will tell you that our hospital is a very different place now from what it was then. We don’t suggest that those ambitions are easily achieved: we all have important day jobs, and having a union doesn’t make the day-to-day go away. We’re still working hard to make our hospital the kind of place we want it to be.

But we want our friends in Marlborough to know that our SHARE union gives us opportunities to compare notes, to talk and think together, to build structures for making improvements. Like our hospital’s senior administration, we believe in the mission of our hospital. We also believe that a labor-management partnership can make our hospital vibrant and resilient. We can’t do it without each other. We believe that the same is true in Marlborough.

We Want to Share Values and Strength

There are 2700 of us (plus our 500 friends in SHARE at UMass Medical School), and our relationships with our employer are extremely complex. As a matter of principle, we maintain kind and respectful conversations with those in management roles. We have support and assistance from in-house SHARE staff organizers who help this happen. Perhaps most importantly, we can have those conversations safely because our union affords us an independent source of power. Our friends at Marlborough need this, too. They deserve to negotiate their own agreements with their hospital leaders.

Let’s Connect

If you have friends at Marlborough Hospital, please let them know about your experience as a SHARE member. They may want to know about raises and benefits, but they may also want to know what we’re trying to do to improve the culture in our hospital, how we’re able to participate in more decisions, and how we work to improve the quality of care for patients.

If you can help connect SHARE Organizers with friends who work at Marlborough Hospital, let us know. If you can help us make an introduction, or would like to know more about what we’re doing, please call the SHARE office (508-929-4020) and leave a message on the voicemail for one of the Marlborough SHARE Organizers to call you back.

Come Cheer the Sox with SHARE: Tickets Available Now

Let's Go SHARE!
Labor Day this year is going to be a lot of fun. The Red Sox will have just swept the Yankees (right?), the weather’s going to be perfect, and SHARE will be a week away from its 20th birthday.

We’re looking forward to it, too, because we reserved a couple nice blocks of seating for Union Night at Fenway, when the Sox host the Blue Jays . . .

  • Date: Labor Day 2017 (Monday, September 4th)
  • Time: 7:10 pm
  • Place: Fenway Park!
  • Cost: $30 in the bleachers, or $15 in the upper bleachers.

Seems like a pretty decent way to round out the Summer and honor the contributions that workers have made to our country. In our section, we’ll be sitting with members our sister NEOP unions, including SHARE at UMass Medical School, HUCTW (the Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers), and USW (the Union of Social Workers at Cambridge Health Alliance).

To sit in our block and take advantage of the discounted union rate, purchase tickets directly from this Red Sox website. Your family and friends are welcome to join in, too. Deadline for purchasing tickets is July 31, 2017.

Questions? Please contact Bobbi-Jo Lewis.